Son demands compensation for Father killed in Kampala bomb blast

Son demands compensation

A 22-year-old son of George Katana who died in last month’s twin bombings in Kampala is demanding compensation.

Francis Katana, who is the firstborn of George Katana, told Uganda Radio Network (URN) that his father died because of security lapses.

Francis said his father who was a food supplier and had an office at Uganda House could not have died if there were no security lapses.

The family, according to Francis, believes that if government compensates for their father’s death, the rewards can enable them to continue living a decent life.

The bomb explosion at Parliament Avenue adjacent to the office of the Inspector General of Government (IGG) went off at 10:06 am killing one, Christopher Sande, on the spot while George Katana died five hours later during an operation at Mulago hospital.

Before the IGG blast, another bomb had gone off three minutes earlier at Kampala Central Police Station (CPS) killing on spot Police Constable Amos Kungu and Ismael Basibe a Boda-boda rider who had gone to claim his impounded motorcycle.

At least 37 people including 23 police officers attached to CPS were left nursing wounds.

Three suicide bombers were also blown by the bomb blasts. In response to the Kampala twin bombings, security has killed six terror suspects.

Those killed in Kampala include Mudasiru Kiryowa and Sheikh Kirevu while those killed in Ntoroko district include Atindiya Yasin, Musa Byaruhanga, Joshua Turikimanya and Joseph Bagonza.

George is survived by four children who including three sons and a daughter. The youngest Phillip Katana is Primary Five. On the fateful day, George had a meeting with a friend at Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) Hall at around 9:30 am.

He later walked towards Parliament Avenue but he was caught in the explosion.

“My daddy survived bullets in 2001. Then I was a year and four months old. He was working at a Fuel Station around Entebbe road and he was on night shift when thugs shot him in the libs. He spent a year at Mulago. I was told that everyone thought he would die of bullet wounds but he survived. It is unfortunate he has died from a bomb blast,” Francis said.

George Katana, according to the family, had started up a vocational training institution in Ssembabule in 2019 but like other schools, its operations were affected by the Covid19 lockdown.

Francis said his father often tipped him on how to run a business and they are optimistic that if compensation is sent by the government, it will be a boost for their late father’s business and their education.

It is not yet clear when the government will be compensating the victims.

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